Buyers Club: the network providing people with affordable hepatitis C medicine

Buyers Club: the network providing people with affordable hepatitis C medicine

In 2013, a cure was found for hepatitis C. It could save millions of lives, but its price tag of between $40,000 and $84,000 for 84 pills puts it far out of most patients’ reach.
20mins
The Guardian

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The people on a mission to live for ever

The people on a mission to live for ever

What if you could cheat death and live for ever? To people in the radical life extension movement, immortality is a real possibility.
14mins
Beyond Brexit, Corbyn and Johnson: Stoke's politics of hope

Beyond Brexit, Corbyn and Johnson: Stoke's politics of hope

In the 2016 referendum, John Harris and John Domokos watched the Staffordshire city vote heavily to leave the EU.
14mins
Ask an expert: the Australian Museum's ornithologist picks her Bird of the Year

Ask an expert: the Australian Museum's ornithologist picks her Bird of the Year

In a move sure to ruffle some feathers, the Australian Museum's top ornithologist shares her top picks for the 2019 Bird of the Year.
5mins
Why do so many black people love kung fu movies?

Why do so many black people love kung fu movies?

Kung fu references crop up a lot in black culture - Jim Kelly in Enter the Dragon, Wesley Snipes' Blade films and hip-hop artists like Wu-Tang Clan.
California wildfires: what role has the climate crisis played?

California wildfires: what role has the climate crisis played?

Thousands of firefighters have been battling wildfires across California, after warm temperatures, strong winds and low humidity turned the state into a 'tinderbox'. So is this the new normal?
6mins
Is this inclusive? Why only 4% of children's book heroes are BAME

Is this inclusive? Why only 4% of children's book heroes are BAME

More than 33% of students at UK schools are from black and minority ethnic backgrounds, but only 4% of the protagonists in children's books in the UK are BAME.
12mins
Testing electric cars: is this the silent future of Australian motoring?

Testing electric cars: is this the silent future of Australian motoring?

Naaman Zhou went to Sydney's Eastern Creek racetrack to try out the latest electric and hybrid vehicles.
Life on Manus: how Australia transformed a tropical island into a prison

Life on Manus: how Australia transformed a tropical island into a prison

In July 2019, Guardian Australia immigration reporter Helen Davidson travelled to Manus Island in Papua New Guinea. Here she explains how the tropical island became an Australian-run prison.
Richard Ratcliffe's determined fight to free wife Nazanin from an Iranian jail

Richard Ratcliffe's determined fight to free wife Nazanin from an Iranian jail

In 2016 Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe was arrested in Iran and charged with espionage. Her young daughter, Gabriella, was with her at the time and the family have been separated ever since.
Lord of the Rain: one man's fight against climate catastrophe

Lord of the Rain: one man's fight against climate catastrophe

Doyte lives in South Omo, Ethiopia, one of the most remote areas in the world and hard hit by the climate crisis.
'This is where we live our truth': visiting America's gay bars

'This is where we live our truth': visiting America's gay bars

The Guardian visits three gay bars in Texas, Mississippi and Indiana, where the owners and punters share how important those spaces remain for a community threatened by Trump.
Salariman rap battle: where Tokyo businessmen say what they really think of each other

Salariman rap battle: where Tokyo businessmen say what they really think of each other

Corporate culture in Japan involves strict hierarchy and long hours that have led to cases of death from overwork – so some 'salarimen' started an underground rap battle to let off steam.
How your period is making other people rich

How your period is making other people rich

Menstrual cycles have historically been a personal topic.
Creature comforts: has the US's emotional support animal epidemic gone too far?

Creature comforts: has the US's emotional support animal epidemic gone too far?

Emotional support animals, or ESAs, have exploded across the US in recent years, with rising numbers of pet owners getting their animals certified online.
Blood, sweat and fears: special report on abuse towards grassroots football referees

Blood, sweat and fears: special report on abuse towards grassroots football referees

The FA has rebooted its Respect Campaign this season to protect grassroots referees in England but many continue to suffer both mental and physical abuse.
17mins
Do cyclists think they're above the law, and does it even matter?

Do cyclists think they're above the law, and does it even matter?

Cyclists can be a nuisance, running red lights, riding on the pavement ... but are they dangerous, and if not, is it a problem if they break the law?
The biggest revolution in gene editing: Crispr-Cas9 explained

The biggest revolution in gene editing: Crispr-Cas9 explained

Prof Jennifer Doudna, one the pioneers of Crispr-Cas9 gene editing, explains how this revolutionary discovery enables precise changes to our DNA.
Brexit teens: coming of age during political chaos

Brexit teens: coming of age during political chaos

Hear how teenagers from across Britain really feel about Brexit, in their own words.
Trapped in Gaza: a day in the life of a rapper who has never left the strip

Trapped in Gaza: a day in the life of a rapper who has never left the strip

Khaled al-Nairab belongs to a generation in Gaza who have spent their entire lives in the fenced-off enclave.
4mins
The Age of Stupid revisited: what's changed on climate change? – video

The Age of Stupid revisited: what's changed on climate change? – video

Ten years after climate movie The Age of Stupid had its green-carpet, solar-powered premiere, we follow its director as she revisits people and places from the film and asks: are we still heading for the catastrophic future it depicted?
Somali Night Fever: the little-known story of Somalia's disco era

Somali Night Fever: the little-known story of Somalia's disco era

In the 1970s and 80s Mogadishu's airwaves were filled with Somali funk, disco, soul and reggae. Musicians rocking afros and bell-bottom trousers would perform at the city's trendiest nightclubs during the height of the country's golden era of music.
16mins
Big data: why should you care? – video

Big data: why should you care? – video

In the second episode of Five Minute Masterminds, the author and broadcaster Timandra Harkness introduces big data, explaining how big it actually is, its impact on recent political elections and how it can change your life.
Why your memories can't be trusted – video

Why your memories can't be trusted – video

Memory does not work like a video tape – it is not stored like a file just waiting to be retrieved. Instead, memories are formed in networks across the brain and every time they are recalled they can be subtly changed.
Can we all move to Mars? Prof Martin Rees on space exploration – video

Can we all move to Mars? Prof Martin Rees on space exploration – video

The first of a series of films called 'Five minute masterminds' starts with Prof Martin Rees, the astronomer royal.
4mins